Students manage demands of academics, work, athletics

BALANCING ACT

Lucy Wurst, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Trying to manage school, sports, homework, a job, a regular sleep schedule and a healthy social life can be beyond overwhelming. For students like Briana Hudson, senior, this is the norm, except that she slips in duties as cheerleading captain.

“I always keep a list in my mind of what’s the most important and make sure I stay on top of everything,” said Hudson. “It’s always school, cheerleading, and then my job. Sometimes I do have my off days, but it’s all about staying motivated and making sure I get the job done. Motivation is the key to being successful.”

Hudson isn’t the only high schooler dealing with these same challenges. Korinna Brandt, senior, works at Kohl’s for four hour shifts on weekdays and six to eight hour shifts on the weekends. She also plays field hockey which takes up a vast majority of her extra time.

“Having a job can make it harder to get all my school work done, but I try to finish most of it in AIP or seminar,” said Brandt. “Managing school, a job, and a sport is very hard to do. You have to be sure you can handle the commitment if you get a job while still in school.”

Instead of trying to juggling basketball, school, and homework Rontrell Gentry, senior, takes a different approach. He works at Schnucks pushing the carts and working in the bagging area three times a week for five to eight hours.

“During the basketball season I have way too much going on so I usually don’t work or I’ll only work on weekends,” said Gentry. “I have to make sure I do my homework before school. I try to make my school life a priority over my work life.”

The whole work and school balance even affects A-plus student and sophomore Jakob Giles. Giles works at Rocket Fizz on weekends for seven hour shifts and finds time for basketball and extracurriculars. Although he admits trying to squeeze too many things in at once can become stressful.

“Sometimes I can’t do my homework, then I ask for less hours,” said Giles. “I get pretty stressed out, but if I manage my time right, I can become successful.”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email