Mr. and Miss Independent Set New Familial Standard

Brooklyn Bass, Staff Writer

It is a reality that American culture has recently gotten accustomed to over the past fifty years; the picture-perfect two-parent household is slowly disappearing as divorce rates increase and teen pregnancy remains as a social issue. In fact, approximately 22 million children are being raised by a single parent, according to About.com.

At U. City, students’ opinions on their family environment differ. Some admit to feeling neglected by the non-custodial parent or freed from another potentially overbearing parent.

“There is more freedom when you live in a one-parent home because with two people there is always a parent there annoying you,” sophomore Erinn Ward said.

When addressing single-parent families, many sociologists question whether the occurrence should be treated as another social issue or an alternative lifestyle. With regard to new advances in the medical field, similar to In Vitro, single parenthood is often chosen willingly. Junior Perri Griffith finds that single parenthood should not necessarily be pursued but occurs depending on specific circumstances.

“It depends on the situation,” Griffith said,”I believe there is always a chance to co-parent.’
Of course, some would say that single parenthood does come with its challenges. Single-parent families are more likely to live below the poverty line than two-parent families. In addition, the custodial parent might also find that they must bear responsibilities traditionally shared by two parents. Junior Lillian Getachew, however, notes that she is fortunate to have a father who contributes to the family despite the fact that her parents are divorced.

“My dad helps my mother raise me,” Getachew said.

Ultimately, Ward believes that her 18-year experience under one parent instead of two differs very little.

“It’s the same thing but different,” Ward said.